Meet With a Medical Marijuana Doctor in Minnesota

Well, this is awkward.

It looks like Veriheal doctors are not currently helping patients in Minnesota to get their medical marijuana cards. However, you can take advantage of our Personalized Consults as a Minnesota resident to better understand cannabis.

BOOK PERSONALIZED CONSULT

How to Get a Medical Marijuana Card in MN

  • STEP 1:

    BOOK AN APPOINTMENT

    When we're booking appointments in Minnesota, you will schedule an appointment to see a medical marijuana doctor in MN through Veriheal at a time that is most convenient for you. Provide basic medical history and book your appointment with a licensed medical marijuana doctor. You will need medical records and the doctor(s) can approve any qualifying condition.

  • STEP 2:

    CONSULT WITH AN MMJ DOCTOR

    Consult with a doctor for 15 mins to evaluate your ailments, and ask any questions you may have about medical marijuana treatment. After the appointment is complete, the doctor will fill out a recommendation form for medical marijuana and approve you. Once you have this you can then use that to apply to the state.

  • STEP 3:

    GET APPROVED

    Once you are approved, you'll register with the state and submit an application. The state will process your application and notify you of your approval and mail your card. Once you have your card in hand, you can begin purchasing from dispensaries. In Minnesota, patients will need to re-certify their license annually by seeing a licensed physician again. Veriheal will get in touch with you when your certification is approaching its expiration to help you setup a renewal consultation. Until the program is live, you can join the Veriheal tribe above to gain access to our large network of offerings that are presently available to you.

The Status of Cannabis Legalization in MN

Cannabis in Minnesota is illegal for recreational use but permitted for medical use. The Minnesota Medical Marijuana Act creates a patient registry under the Department of Health relating to the therapeutic use of medical cannabis. It authorizes the use of medical cannabis in limited forms for certain qualifying medical conditions and regulates the distribution and manufacture of medical cannabis. It also creates a task force to conduct an impact assessment on medical cannabis therapeutic research and provides for certain criminal and civil protections for parties involved in the registry program. This passed the House 89–40 and the Senate 46–16.

Beginning in spring 2015, Minnesotans with qualified medical conditions began receiving certification from Minnesota-licensed health care practitioners, submitting applications to the MDH and enrolling in a patient registry. In July 2018, they were able to purchase cannabis from distribution facilities set up by medical cannabis manufacturers.

Qualifying Conditions

Minnesota allows for 13 qualifying conditions with the possibility for adding more as approved by the health commissioner.

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease
  • Autism
  • Cachexia, or wasting disease
  • Cancer, if the underlying condition or treatment causes severe or chronic pain, nausea, or severe vomiting
  • Glaucoma
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Inflammatory bowel disease, including Crohn’s disease
  • Intractable pain
  • Obstructive sleep apnea
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Seizures, including those characteristics of epilepsy
  • Severe and persistent muscle spasms, including those characteristics of multiple sclerosis
  • Tourette’s syndrome
  • Terminal illness with a probable life expectancy of less than one year if the illness or its treatment produces one or more of the following:
    • Cachexia, or severe wasting disease
    • Nausea or severe vomiting
    • Severe or chronic pain

Patient Application

To receive medical marijuana, patients must enroll in the Medical Cannabis Registry. A licensed health-care practitioner, such as a physician, physician assistant, or practice registered nurse, must certify that the patient has one or more of the qualifying conditions.

There is a $200 registration fee, although reduced fees are available through state or federal programs. Annual re-certification is required for $50.