Learn More About Medical Marijuana
In New Mexico

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How To Get a Medical Marijuana Card in New Mexico

STEP 1

BOOK AN APPOINTMENT

Schedule an appointment to see a doctor through Veriheal at a time that is most convenient for you. Consult with a doctor for 10-15 mins to evaluate your ailments, and ask any questions you may have about medical marijuana treatment.

STEP 2

REGISTER WITH THE NM DOH

Sign up as a new patient through the state and provide some basic information and upload a picture of a valid government issued ID that shows your address as well as a clear picture of yourself with a white background.

STEP 3

GET APPROVED

Once you are approved, the doctor will upload your information and approve you for medical cannabis. You can immediately print your certification and begin buying cannabis from any dispensary in New Mexico.

About Cannabis in NM

Cannabis in New Mexico is illegal for recreational use and remains a criminal offense, but is allowed for medical purposes. The New Mexico Legislature in 2007 passed SB 523, or the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act. SB 523 offers patients and caregivers access to medical cannabis in a system regulated by the New Mexico Department of Health (NMDOH). Currently, cannabis access is reserved for qualified patients and their caregivers.

The NMDOH has developed rules and regulations to establish, implement, and administer the statewide Medical Cannabis Program. Possession or consumption of cannabis would result in serious criminal penalties for consumers who are not registered patients or caregivers.

Qualifying Conditions:

  • Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), or Lou Gehrig’s disease
  • Cancer
  • Cervical dystonia
  • Crohn’s Disease
  • Epilepsy
  • Glaucoma
  • Hepatitis C
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Hospice Care
  • Huntington’s Disease
  • Inclusion-body myositis
  • Inflammatory autoimmune-mediated arthritis
  • Intractable nausea or vomiting
  • Intractable spasticity
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Painful peripheral neuropathy
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)
  • Severe anorexia or cachexia (wasting syndrome)
  • Severe chronic pain
  • Ulcerative colitis

Application Process:

  • Complete a patient registry application.
  • Obtain a valid written certification from a qualified health-care provider.
  • Provide a state-issued driver’s license or identification card to establish proof of New Mexico residency.
  • Designate a caregiver, if applicable.
  • Receive a registry identification card; there is no fee for the card.

Patients in the registry are authorized to purchase and consume medical cannabis if they meet certain requirements for eligibility. Patients who have received a physician’s certification for a qualifying condition must submit an application and a valid New Mexico identification card to the NMDOH. Once submitted, an application is reviewed medically and administratively to ensure that all requirements are met. Upon approval, registration and written certifications are valid for up to one year. Patients are required to submit renewal applications at least 30 days before their registry card expires. The NMDOH does not charge a fee for either processing patients’ applications or issuing new or renewal registry cards.

Purchasing Limits:

Under the state Medical Cannabis Program, patients are not permitted to obtain more than 8 ounces of pharmaceutical-grade cannabis over a 90-day period. Qualified patients can designate a primary caregiver who can purchase and transport the medical marijuana to the patient.

Consumption:

Under the Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act, the state’s Medical Cannabis Program does not allow patients or caregivers to consume or possess medical marijuana in the following areas:

  • In a school bus or public vehicle
  • On school grounds or property
  • In the workplace of the qualified patient’s or primary caregiver’s employment
  • A public park, recreation center, youth center or other public place.
Data last updated 01/21/2019