Arthritis​

When you see the word arthritis you may think of that one disease that affects joints, right? Well. Arthritis is an informal way to call joint pain or joint disease. Arthritis is the leading cause of disability in America and it can affect people of all ages, but it is more common in women and elders. There are more than 100 different types of arthritis and the symptoms often have joint pain and swelling in the affected joint. Nowadays more than 50 million adults and 300,000 children suffer from some type of arthritis.

The most common type of arthritis is the Osteoarthritis, a degenerative type of the disease, and it usually affects hands, knees, hips or spine. This type of arthritis often appears on people as they get older, if they injured a joint or are overweight. The symptoms of this type of arthritis include pain, swelling and reduced motion in your joints. To prevent it, people should avoid injury and repetitive movements, maintaining a healthy weight and staying active.

Rheumatoid Arthritis is an autoimmune disease and occurs when your own immune system attacks your body’s tissues. The cause of rheumatoid arthritis is unknown, but genes, environment, and hormones may contribute to it. This type of arthritis causes loss of function in your joints, along with pain, swelling, and stiffness and usually affects wrists and fingers. The form of this disease that affects children is called Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis.

Infectious Arthritis occurs when a bacteria or virus spreads to the joints to other parts of the body, causing intense pain in the joins, swelling, fever, and incapability of moving the affected joint.

There is one type of arthritis that affects people with psoriasis, called Psoriatic Arthritis. There is no cure and not necessarily your joint and skin will be affected at the same time.

Gout or gouty arthritis is a type of metabolic arthritis that occurs after the person’s uric acid builds up and form needle-like crystals in the joint, what causes extreme levels of pain. This type of arthritis can come and go, as the acid uric levels lower and increases. If the levels don’t drop, this arthritis can become chronic.

Marijuana is known for relieving pain and having an ability to treat inflammatory diseases. The treatment of arthritis symptoms in both men and women has proven to be a success when used medical marijuana. The use of marijuana to treat chronic pain is a better option than opioids, and by far a safer and more natural option to the patients. The number of deaths by overdose of opiates in U.S. drops whenever medical marijuana is legalized in a state and many people who suffered from a former addiction on opioids tend to stop after resorting to medical cannabis.

In 2006, the British Royal Nation Hospital for Rheumatic Disease reported great results with the treatment of arthritis with cannabinoids. The use of cannabis extract significantly improved the patients pain movement, pain at rest, quality of sleep, inflammation and intensity of pain compared to a placebo. There were also no serious adverse effects on the patients. Investigators at London’s Kennedy Institute for Rheumatology reported that the administration of cannabidiol suppressed the progression of arthritis in vitro in the animals tested.

Marijuana is often used to help with the symptoms and some doctors recommend the patients to continue the treatment with drugs that proven to treat the disease at the root of the problem. Researches are very limited when we talk about the results of medical marijuana in patients with arthritis but unlike those who have Osteoarthritis, there are some risks of smoking cannabis for patients with RA. People with Rheumatoid arthritis are associated with a higher risk of lung problems and heart attacks, so if you want to treat it with marijuana you may want to chose oils, pills or other non-smokable forms to do it.