Jamestown Canyon Virus (JCV)

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Jamestown Canyon Virus (JCV) and Medical Cannabis Treatment

Jamestown Canyon virus, mostly found in the upper Midwest of North America, is caused by infected mosquitoes. Often contracted in the late spring and through mid-fall, the rare virus can cause infection on the brain, called encephalitis, or lining the brain, known as meningitis, reports the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). In 2018, there were 58 cases of Jamestown Canyon virus, with Minnesota and Wisconsin holding the most diagnosis. 

Once bitten, symptoms are set within a few days and up to two weeks, with up to half of the patients hospitalized for treatment. Jamestown Canyon virus has several symptoms, including fever, fatigue, and headaches. While there is no cure or vaccination for the Jamestown Canyon virus, there are ways to alleviate the symptoms as they occur with medical cannabis, specifically headaches.

As described by WebMD, headache is a specific pain felt from mixed brain signals. The respected medical news source cites a University of Colorado study reporting up to “121 people who got regular migraine headaches used marijuana daily to prevent attacks,” with up to 40% of study participants stating their migraines were cut in half in just a month.  

Jamestown Canyon Virus Causes, Symptoms & Treatments

After being bitten by an infected mosquito and contracting the condition, the CDC reports, along with typical symptoms of headache and fatigue, Jamestown Canyon virus also causes a cough, runny nose, and sore throat. In rare cases, when the brain becomes infected by the virus, stiff neck, trouble communicating, and seizures can set it in. 

The first line of defense from getting the infection is to wear long sleeves and long pants to prevent mosquitoes from making contact with skin. While covering skin entirely is the best way to avoid contracting the virus, there are also over the repellant sprays that ward off infected mosquitoes. The CDC states with no medication available for the virus, the only way to treat the virus is with rest, fluids, and over-the-counter medicine for pain and fever. 

The Effects of Cannabinoids on Jamestown Canyon Virus

The Journal of Pain, the medical periodical for the U.S. Association for the Study of Pain, reported in 2019 how headache and migraine ratings were lessened by 50% after patients consumed cannabis. Additionally, “evidence for medication overuse headache was not detected,” showing too much cannabis is not as harmful as too much narcotic pain killers. 

This particular statistic is significant in light of the opioid epidemic caused by the over-prescription of narcotic pain killers. A 2018 report out of the journal Cannabis and Cannabinoid Research revealed: “emerging evidence” of cannabis successfully alleviating opioid use disorder.

“The opioid epidemic has become an immense problem in North America, and despite decades of research on the most effective means to treat opioid use disorder (OUD), overdose deaths are at an all-time high, and relapse remains pervasive,” according to the journal. The study concluded that “the compelling nature of these data and the relative safety profile of cannabis warrant further exploration of cannabis as an adjunct or alternative treatment for OUD.”

Medical cannabis alleviating symptoms of Jamestown Canyon virus, including headache and pain, shows how the plant’s properties, specifically tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD), not only help prevent conditions but also address side effects of dozens of other disorders.

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Data Last Updated 10/05/2020

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